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A Weighty Issue

April 20, 2010

“We are not only what we eat, we are what we feed our children. … Doing right by our kids means dong right by their health – body and soul.” — Peggy Orenstein

There’s something about Peggy Orenstein’s essay, The Fat Trap, in The New York Times that resonated with me. In the article, Orenstein talks about how parents – mothers in particular – have to balance that fine line between their child’s health and not obsessing with weight and body image, especially with respect to daughters.

I found the statements above incredibly profound. The obsession with feeding our children and weight begins on the day your child is born when the mother is asked how she will feed her child. Will you breastfeed or formula-feed? What is better? Which will make the child healthier? And it only continues when the new parents go to their children’s pediatrician and are told with each visit in which weight percentile the child falls.

Weight is tough topic for me to write about. It’s been an emotional issue that’s been a part of my core from a very young age. But it’s one that I’ve recognized and embraced, especially now that I have a daughter for whose health I am responsible.

I was never a skinny girl. I was not what you’d call chubby either. I was average, maybe slightly more, but certainly not obese. My first experience with weight and dieting was in respect to my mother. My mom is not a large woman. But I remember that she was constantly on a diet of some sort. When I was 6 or 7-years-old, we were sitting in the family room watching Charlotte’s Web. For some reason, I remember saying, “Mom, it’s a pig. Like you.”

I realized quickly that I hurt her feelings. But I was puzzled because I distinctly remember hearing my mother herself refer to herself with such a derogatory term. A 6-year-old wouldn’t know that’s how to be cruel. I was just repeating what I heard from her. But it was a stark realization that something was not good about being overweight (which, again, she was not).

When I was in the sixth grade, I remember being weighed at the doctor’s office and the number on the scale was just slightly over 100 pounds. My parents later told me that was too much for a sixth grader to be weighing and I needed to watch what I ate (whatever that meant to an 11-year-old). When my grandfather remarried, I found a sleeveless dress to wear to the wedding. I was 13-years-old. My parents said I needed to lose five pounds to wear the dress. I was constantly worried about the perception of what I put in my mouth. Whether it was more than one slice of pizza or dessert, I always felt like I was being watched.

The worse came for me when I was a freshman in high school. My parents noticed that I ate from a bag of Cheetos in our house. This after-school snack led to a several-hours-long conversation about the fact that, they believed, I was overweight and needed to go on a diet. Now I would ask why Cheetos were even in the house if they were so bad, but that’s beside the point. They put me on a reduced-carbohydrate diet. I felt like a disappointment.

In terms of exercise, physical activity was never something the entire family engaged in for fun and for health. Instead exercise was punishment for being overweight. My parents would tell me to exercise because I needed to lose weight. And the more they would tell me to exercise, the more I resisted. My dad regularly made trips to the high school football field to run (two miles each day) and one of my sisters was very athletic, always playing soccer and basketball from an early age. My mother never exercised. When we had dogs, they never got walks.

Somehow through all of this, I realized that my parents’ attitude toward food and dieting was not normal. I took my parent’s criticisms to heart. But at the same time, I knew they were not right. It’s a wonder I did not become anorexic or develop severe depression. But I think through all of this, deep down, I knew I was not a bad person.

My attitude toward exercise and food changed during my freshmen year of college. It was second semester and I put on a few pounds like all freshmen living on-campus do. I remember feeling gross and miserable, when a close friend took me to a gym for the first time. The gym was intriguing to me – you could run, bike, elliptical, it didn’t matter. After we worked out, I assumed I would skip eating that evening, or just eat something tiny like a salad. My friend told me that was so unhealthy and your body needs food; but good food. I never heard of this before. I was so used to severely cutting calories and carbs that I never realized how exactly to eat right. We went to dinner together at the school cafeteria where she showed me what good foods I should be eating.

And from then on, things changed for me. I bought my first gym membership that spring and I learned how to eat right and exercised regularly for the first time in my life. That spring and summer was the first time I lost weight because of my own motivation. It felt good to just be healthy.

It has taken me some 30+ years to get to a place where I’m finally at peace with who I am, the foods I eat, and the realization that (for me) the only way to really maintain a healthy body is to exercise.

I’m not saying I have not struggled. Right now, my body challenge has to do with making peace with my shape and size post-baby. I’m learning to deal with a new reality that I may never look the same as before my pregnancy. It’s definitely a challenge. Of course, I’d love to wear all my smaller clothes and look the way I did before Sophie came into my life. But I take each day as I can and embrace natural steps to make that happen.

I feel like society’s obsession with weight is getting worse. Nearly every day, I read people’s Facebook status updates about how they’re frustrated they aren’t losing weight or just enrolled in major exercise programs to shed pounds. Just this year alone, I know at least three new moms who are dieting postpartum, enrolling in Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers, or binge exercising. And their babies were less than 4-months-old at the time!

Recently I’ve noticed that nearly every issues of People magazine now features several pages of “How’d they lose it” features. And what’s ironic is those stories will often border an article about someone struggling with weight or an eating disorder. I love People, but something seems wrong here.

Now that I’m a mother of a daughter, these issues of weight and exercise have come full circle. My goal with Sophie is that I teach her about nutrition and make exercise a fun thing to do. I want to teach Sophie how to maintain a healthy mind, body and soul. I hope with those key values and support, her journey through this weight-obsessed society will be easier than mine.

5 Comments leave one →
  1. April 21, 2010 3:29 am

    I wish all mothers thought the same as you and all the nations kids would be healthier in mind and body.

    I have been very self conscious all my life, my weight as ballooned up and down since I was a kid, and not at 30 I am the biggest size ever. But, I have changed and the fat is dropping off and I feel great. It was only recently (at the age of 30) that I stopped thinking about using exercise to lose weight. I had failed many times before because of it. I got bored with going to the gym and working out, and eventually I burnt out and stopped, felt guilty and ended up putting on weight.

    It wasn’t until I changed my mindset to, “you don’t get fat my not exercising, you do it from eating too much of the wrong stuff”. I have changed my diet to good, wholesome, natural fresh food products. I cook from scratch from home rather than processed meals. My exercises is for fun and recreation, not because I have to. This has ensured I stick at it, because it is fun, not a chore.

    Matt

    • leahsinger permalink
      April 21, 2010 11:21 am

      Matt — Thank you so much for your nice words and thoughtful response. I completely agree with you that until you get in the right mindset about food and exercise, things will never change. That’s why now I never “diet.” I continue to eat right (like you, whole foods, unprocessed and cooking from scratch) and exercise, doing the best I can. Good for you for figuring that out for yourself. I know so many people that still struggle with that concept. Thanks for reading!

  2. May 29, 2010 2:25 pm

    Your words ring so true! My mother was very aware of her physicality. She was always watching what she ate, or so she said. However, her actions were in stark contrast to her words. She ate snack foods, drank coffee all day, and didn’t ever exercise or eat balanced meals.

    Aside from all of that, I, like you learned about healthful eating later in life (way later!). I now have to steward my family by first setting a good example and second by providing healthy foods and lastly by fostering a lifestyle where activity is mandatory.

    Being a mother to two boys, I have less to worry about when it comes to ensuring a positive self image in this world of Barbie and Bratz dolls. But, I have the other side of the spectrum-teaching my sons to respect women and their bodies.

    Good luck to us both.

  3. January 5, 2012 8:21 pm

    Incredible, honest post. I’ve been there and I hear you. As for all the weight loss in the media–it’s not a great thing when it’s already tiny people like starlets. But I don’t think it’s bad for people to see those who need to lose weight do it through eating better and exercising rather than something gimmicky or through surgery. Your larger point though about mothers and daughters (parents in general) is a really important one and one that concerns me. Actually, I have someone guest posting on this EXACT topic next week.

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